PETER BRODERICK – OLD TIME / SOLACE IN GALA

The release of Music For Confluence will be preceded by the double A-side single Old Time / Solace In Gala on November 7th and includes an exclusive digital 14-track bonus score entitled Music For Grace And Mercy – a film of Haitians helping Haitians.

You can get it on Vinyl/Download here:
erasedtapes.com/​store/​index/​ERATP035

And you can PRE-ORDER the album on CD/Download here:
erasedtapes.com/​store/​index/​ERATP036


MUSIC FOR CONFLUENCE – Score by Peter Broderick

Following on from his contemporary dance scores Music For Falling From Trees and Music For Congregation, November 28th, 2011 will see Broderick return with a brand new work released on Erased Tapes Records, entitled Music For Confluence. Created for documentary filmmakers Jennifer Anderson and Vernon Lott, the soundtrack takes the listener through waves of stark emotions.

'I had been asked to make the score for a documentary film called Confluence. The film is based in the Lewiston, Idaho area, not too far from where I grew up in the USA, and it chronicles several mysterious cases of young girls found murdered or gone missing around 1980, all of which seem to lead back to one man who for a variety of reasons has not been able to be charged with these crimes.

I set out to create some textural soundscapes which could compliment the building tension of the story without being too intrusive or suggestive. Days and nights, snowed in and experimenting with layers and layers of whichever instruments I had around, finding a murky atmosphere that fit with the uneasy feeling which the film gave to me. On New Year’s Eve I was inside, recording the final notes for the score. I had finished everything except the piece for the credits. After speaking with one of the directors of the film, Vernon Lott, we decided the song for the credits should be different from the rest of the score. So while the fireworks were exploding outside my window, I was recording Old Time, a song which for me felt like a breath-of-fresh-air after story which can only leave you wondering…’ 
– Peter Broderick 

The official Confluence trailer can be watched here: vimeo.com/​erasedtapes/​confluence

The official Grace And Mercy trailer can be watched here: vimeo.com/​13145302

7fingers out now in Europe! // Condolences & Wishes for Japan // Nils Frahm & Peter Broderick - Japanese Tour 2011

I was forced to watch the entire first series of The Walking Dead till 5 am and thought I was still watching it when I saw the news about Japan this morning… How terrible!

I’m glad to hear that our distribution team at P*Dis in Tokyo are all fine. World’s End Girlfriend is OK too! Maeda-san just emailed me saying he only lost a vase in the earthquake, but it might have been because he’s pracitsing the guitar…

We will keep everyone updated about Nils Frahm & Peter Broderick’s Japanese Tour!

Hopefully they will still be able to visit all you lovely people and play for you in April:

I’m sending my blessings to everyone out there, their families and friends.

May they all find shelter!

__________

Today is the EU release of 7fingers by Nils Frahm & Anne Müller!

The flashy vinyls just arrived at our Berlin office and look absolutely amazing!!!

You can order them here: http://erasedtapes.com/store/index/ERATP028

I’m very thrilled to see it even hit the front page of iTunes Germany, sitting rather comfortably between The Beatles, The Social Network soundtrack and… Bambi! Hurray!

That’s almost as surreal as being recommended in the Bleep.com staff chart:

http://bleep.com/index.php?page=dynamic&module=staffCharts

And highly recommended on Zero”:

A new collaboration from the talented pianist and composer Nils Frahm with performer and cellist Anne Müller sees a beautiful symbiotic relationship form. String and piano arrangements, sculpted with pulses, rhythms, loops and field recordings make for a boldly unique album. Highly recommended’

Mojo Magazine gave it 4 stars:

'The combined talents of wunderkind pianist Frahm and Anne Müller here produce a subtle, seductive chamber music sporadically interleaved with electronic glitches’ ****

The Line Of Best Fit made the title track their Track Of The Day:

'An album that sees headphone electronica, modern classical, and soundtrack music all converge to beautiful, intelligent, often terrifying effect’

http://www.thelineofbestfit.com/2011/03/sotd-2012-nils-frahm-anne-muller-7fingers/

RadioEins in Berlin made it their Lounge-CD Of The Week - whatever that means, I guess it’s good.

So yeah.

Congrats to Nils and Anne!

Can’t wait to see them perform 7fingers live this summer…

Dead proud.

Much love,

Robert

Erased Tapes Piano Octopus: 
Nils Frahm, Peter Broderick & Ólafur Arnalds live in Brussels

Captured by Robert Raths at Autumn Falls Festival - Botanique, Brussels on November 28, 2010.

One of my personal highlights of 2010 was watching Nils, Peter and Óli play together with 6 hands on 1 piano. Luckily I had a camera on me…

PETER BRODERICK – Music For Contemporary Dance (Ltd. Edition Gatefold Double Clear/Black 10” Vinyl and Download) out October 18 for Pre-Order now: http://www.erasedtapes.com/store/index/ERATP026

Peter Broderick is like the Swiss Army Knife of musicians – compact, elegant and multi-instrumental. What sets him apart is his restraint. With an arsenal of talents at his disposal, he prefers to reveal only one or two at a time. Born January 20, 1987, he grew up in a small town in Oregon. Coming from a musical family, he started violin lessons at age 7, and in high school became interested in all different kinds of instruments. He started to play piano, guitar, banjo, mandolin, musical saw,

and anything else he could find. After high school he moved to Portland, Oregon, where he studied music theory and filmmaking. During this time he began to play in multiple bands and establishing himself as a regular session musician for artists like M. Ward. His big break came in late 2007 when Peter was invited by some of his musical heroes, the Danish band Efterklang, to move to Copenhagen and join the live band.

Countless limited releases from homemade tape recordings toThe Sunday Times #19 Album of 2008 ‘Home’, established Peter Broderick as the young composer to watch. After endless touring around the world, both as a solo act and with Efterklang, Peter has found a new home in Berlin, where he works side by side with label mate Nils Frahm.

Broderick released his first score ‘Music for Falling From Trees’ on Erased Tapes in 2009.Created for a contemporary dance by London-based choreographer Adrienne Hart (Neon Productions), the 30-minute piece in seven sections received much acclaim, both for its emotive and fitting accompaniment to Hart’s choreography and for its ability to work as a self–contained release.

‘Beautiful, minimal and bewitching’Mojo

'The work of a master composer' – Drowned In Sound

The dance tells the story of a man in a psychiatric hospital, and his struggle to maintain his identity. Adrienne was looking for a score of piano and strings, so he left the guitar and his voice aside and focused entirely on those two timbres. ‘I decided to take this literally and make a rule not to use any other instrument. In the script it called for the sound of a ticking clock. I made this sound by tapping on the body of the violin with my fingernails.’

Falling From Trees toured this year’s UK summer festivals Glastonbury and Edinburgh Fringe.

This show is an outstanding example of all the strands coming together in an exciting and satisfying whole – great music from Peter Broderick, intriguing and visceral video projections tied together aptly with Adrienne Hart’s choreography’ **** – The Skinny

In early 2010 Peter Broderick was approached by the collaborative media artist duo Kit Monkman and Tom Wexler aka KMA, who asked him to create a score for Congregation, KMA’s most ambitious work to date. The world’s first ever ballet designed, choreographed and composed entirely for pedestrian performers, Congregation has been commissioned by Scan and the British Council. Due to premiere simultaneously at Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai as part of World Expo and Bournemouth for the Inside Out Festival, further performances will follow at Tate Britain London this autumn.

To coincide with both KMA’s and Peter Broderick’s string of live performances, Erased Tapes will release a highly limited double 10” gatefold vinyl edition on October 18. Featuring both Music for Falling From Trees and Music for Congregation under the collective title Music for Contemporary Dance, this release will further demonstrate that this young artist at the cusp of his career has already emerged as a composer in his own right.

'Painfully young and unnervingly talented' The Economist’s Intelligent Life

‘A songwriter of beguiling depth’The Sunday Times

‘A precociously talented, classically trained multi-instrumentalist’ The Independent

More info:

http://www.erasedtapes.com

http://www.peterbroderick.net

http://www.neonproductions.org

http://www.kma.co.uk

THE MONOGRAPH INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT RATHS
Erased Tapes Records was set up by ‘initiator’ Robert Raths in 2007. Boasting artists such as Rival Consoles, Codes In The Clouds and Ólafur Arnalds, the London-based label specialises in a genre of music that the Erased Tapes website describes as ‘cinematic pop music’. An up and coming and widely recognised label, Erased Tapes has a reputation for being innovative and forward thinking, and for taking great care of its artists. The Monograph caught up with creator Robert Raths to find out a little bit more about his musical background, his methods and his beliefs…

‘My Dad was really into soul singers, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, Aretha Franklin. And my Mum was more into bands, like The Shadows, Kinks, Beach Boys, Stones. But what I was really interested in was the records that were still sealed, unappreciated wedding gifts. The ones that my parents would describe as ‘too heavy or experimental’, like Pink Floyd, Miles Davis or Leonard Cohen. I think those kind of built the foundation of it all’ explains Raths when questioned about the roots of his interest in music.

Following on from the early musical education of his parents’ record collections, Raths soon came across more ‘challenging, deeper, multi-layered’ music acts. ‘Being a teenager in Germany, I really got into electronic music…and I quite quickly discovered other things like Björk, Tom Waits, Flaming Lips and a German band called The Notwist, who in my eyes formed the perfect cross-over between experimental and pop music. I think that’s where my real journey started in terms of contemporary music, and getting more and more into modern classical music at the same time, like Keith Jarrett, Arvo Pärt or Steve Reich.’

Raths’ journey towards founding his own record label took an unusual and unique route. His passion for painting, film and photography led him to a position at a German music television station as a set designer, before beginning to train as an architect, and finally setting up Erased Tapes in 2007.  So was creating a label always the plan? ‘No…it’s a mystery to me, still. Obviously, I had a decent record collection, and I was always interested in music. I played the piano when I was younger, and in my teenage years I was in several rock bands.’ Following his stint as a set designer, his view of the music industry was less than savoury, ‘everything that I knew about the industry back then was just people on cocaine, people in a rush…not really caring about the actual, creative bit.’ After leaving the television station, Raths travelled America before going to London to study architecture, and it was only due to University bureaucracy leading to ‘a forced gap year’ that meant that Raths had some time on his hands in London to rediscover the musical and artistic creativity overlooked by colleagues in his previous job.

Discussing the foundation of Erased Tapes, Raths explains that ‘all my artists back then got in touch with me online as they saw that I was being creative and forward thinking in finding new currents for music and art, and I tried to help them get up on a platform. The whole record label part just came with it.’ Rather than playing just a business role in the record label, Raths continues to be creative, both in advice for his artists and in providing a title for his own position, ‘I don’t feel like a C.E.O or a director, or a label boss…they’re all tags that just don’t fit my purpose. The thing that I came up with was ’initiator’ simply because, initially I’m just the guy that has good ears, I guess. I hear something that moves me and inspires me, so I help that person to develop their gift and to move more people with it. I’m an initiator, the guy who makes the initial effort to promote their music.’

What approach does Erased Tapes take that perhaps differs to the treatment artists would receive from other labels? ‘I like to think of every artist as a friend, as a human being that I’m interested in as well, not just in a business sense, but as the man behind the creation. I don’t want to sign someone up to the label and then just see them as a product or a catalogue number or something.’ Raths goes on to explain how ‘it’s very important that you have people around you that, as much as they value your gift, also help you question things and to see things from a different angle.’ Every 10th release from Erased Tapes marks the time for a compilation of tracks from each of the artists to be showcased. ‘As much as every artist is unique and they should be a composer in their own right, it’s also very important to show that we’re a family, we’re a lot of different kinds of people, but we are under the umbrella of Erased Tapes.’

How do you go about finding artists for Erased Tapes? ‘I get approached every day, I get sent links and I do listen to all of them. I try and take my time, I usually flag them in my inbox and then eventually find the time when I’m travelling or something, to go through the tracks and have a listen.’ Although sometimes a monotonous task, Raths explains that he continues with this method as ‘there could be that one guy who sends a really unimpressive looking CD-R but what’s coming out of the speakers is magic’.

Raths seems to take a laid back approach to his signings, believing that ‘if someone out there is interested in finding the right people, I’m pretty sure they will. The best bits in life are just meant to be, you know, and just as Ólafur and Codes In The Clouds and the BEF and everyone else on the label ended up working with me, I believe others will also fall into place. Now I actually meet new artists through my existing artists, like I met Nils Frahm through Peter Broderick for example, and Nils is obviously a producer in Berlin, so he meets a lot of new artists. He’s introducing me to new people all the time.’

So what’s happening in the world of Erased Tapes at the moment? ‘I’m in the process of uploading a brand new release. It’s called ‘Unter | Über’ (Below | Above) by Nils Frahm. It’s a beautiful teaser of what’s to come next because we’re going to release a new full length album with him in the winter.’ The video for Unter can be seen HERE. ‘It feels like the end of a long summer, it’s something you can play over and over again, it gets me every time.’

Incredibly passionate about what he’s doing, and full of enthusiasm for what is to come, Robert Raths is a shining example of a modern day label ‘boss’. Nurturing, warm and open, he encourages the best from his artists and receives stunning music innovations in return. ‘That’s what I like about music, and that’s what I like about running a label, you can make people happy with it. All my life I’ve been looking for something that feels fulfilling, and this is it. This is what I ended up doing, and it doesn’t really matter how I got there. There are so many other things I could have done, I could have been a famous architect or a famous singer in an infamous band! But I ended up forming Erased Tapes and it’s something that means a lot to me, to my artists and to a lot of other people out there.’

From all of us here at The Monograph we would just like to say thanks to Erased Tapes for being so helping in working with us for Label of the Month. For more information on Erased Tapes and the work they do please visithttp://erasedtapes.co.uk

Source: http://themonograph.co.uk/2010/08/robert-raths-interview/

THE MONOGRAPH INTERVIEW WITH ROBERT RATHS

Erased Tapes Records was set up by ‘initiator’ Robert Raths in 2007. Boasting artists such as Rival Consoles, Codes In The Clouds and Ólafur Arnalds, the London-based label specialises in a genre of music that the Erased Tapes website describes as ‘cinematic pop music’. An up and coming and widely recognised label, Erased Tapes has a reputation for being innovative and forward thinking, and for taking great care of its artists. The Monograph caught up with creator Robert Raths to find out a little bit more about his musical background, his methods and his beliefs…

‘My Dad was really into soul singers, Wilson Pickett, Otis Redding, Aretha Franklin. And my Mum was more into bands, like The Shadows, Kinks, Beach Boys, Stones. But what I was really interested in was the records that were still sealed, unappreciated wedding gifts. The ones that my parents would describe as ‘too heavy or experimental’, like Pink Floyd, Miles Davis or Leonard Cohen. I think those kind of built the foundation of it all’ explains Raths when questioned about the roots of his interest in music.

Following on from the early musical education of his parents’ record collections, Raths soon came across more ‘challenging, deeper, multi-layered’ music acts. ‘Being a teenager in Germany, I really got into electronic music…and I quite quickly discovered other things like Björk, Tom Waits, Flaming Lips and a German band called The Notwist, who in my eyes formed the perfect cross-over between experimental and pop music. I think that’s where my real journey started in terms of contemporary music, and getting more and more into modern classical music at the same time, like Keith Jarrett, Arvo Pärt or Steve Reich.’

Raths’ journey towards founding his own record label took an unusual and unique route. His passion for painting, film and photography led him to a position at a German music television station as a set designer, before beginning to train as an architect, and finally setting up Erased Tapes in 2007. So was creating a label always the plan? ‘No…it’s a mystery to me, still. Obviously, I had a decent record collection, and I was always interested in music. I played the piano when I was younger, and in my teenage years I was in several rock bands.’ Following his stint as a set designer, his view of the music industry was less than savoury, ‘everything that I knew about the industry back then was just people on cocaine, people in a rush…not really caring about the actual, creative bit.’ After leaving the television station, Raths travelled America before going to London to study architecture, and it was only due to University bureaucracy leading to ‘a forced gap year’ that meant that Raths had some time on his hands in London to rediscover the musical and artistic creativity overlooked by colleagues in his previous job.

Discussing the foundation of Erased Tapes, Raths explains that ‘all my artists back then got in touch with me online as they saw that I was being creative and forward thinking in finding new currents for music and art, and I tried to help them get up on a platform. The whole record label part just came with it.’ Rather than playing just a business role in the record label, Raths continues to be creative, both in advice for his artists and in providing a title for his own position, ‘I don’t feel like a C.E.O or a director, or a label boss…they’re all tags that just don’t fit my purpose. The thing that I came up with was ’initiator’ simply because, initially I’m just the guy that has good ears, I guess. I hear something that moves me and inspires me, so I help that person to develop their gift and to move more people with it. I’m an initiator, the guy who makes the initial effort to promote their music.’

What approach does Erased Tapes take that perhaps differs to the treatment artists would receive from other labels? ‘I like to think of every artist as a friend, as a human being that I’m interested in as well, not just in a business sense, but as the man behind the creation. I don’t want to sign someone up to the label and then just see them as a product or a catalogue number or something.’ Raths goes on to explain how ‘it’s very important that you have people around you that, as much as they value your gift, also help you question things and to see things from a different angle.’ Every 10th release from Erased Tapes marks the time for a compilation of tracks from each of the artists to be showcased. ‘As much as every artist is unique and they should be a composer in their own right, it’s also very important to show that we’re a family, we’re a lot of different kinds of people, but we are under the umbrella of Erased Tapes.’

How do you go about finding artists for Erased Tapes? ‘I get approached every day, I get sent links and I do listen to all of them. I try and take my time, I usually flag them in my inbox and then eventually find the time when I’m travelling or something, to go through the tracks and have a listen.’ Although sometimes a monotonous task, Raths explains that he continues with this method as ‘there could be that one guy who sends a really unimpressive looking CD-R but what’s coming out of the speakers is magic’.

Raths seems to take a laid back approach to his signings, believing that ‘if someone out there is interested in finding the right people, I’m pretty sure they will. The best bits in life are just meant to be, you know, and just as Ólafur and Codes In The Clouds and the BEF and everyone else on the label ended up working with me, I believe others will also fall into place. Now I actually meet new artists through my existing artists, like I met Nils Frahm through Peter Broderick for example, and Nils is obviously a producer in Berlin, so he meets a lot of new artists. He’s introducing me to new people all the time.’

So what’s happening in the world of Erased Tapes at the moment? ‘I’m in the process of uploading a brand new release. It’s called ‘Unter | Über’ (Below | Above) by Nils Frahm. It’s a beautiful teaser of what’s to come next because we’re going to release a new full length album with him in the winter.’ The video for Unter can be seen HERE. ‘It feels like the end of a long summer, it’s something you can play over and over again, it gets me every time.’

Incredibly passionate about what he’s doing, and full of enthusiasm for what is to come, Robert Raths is a shining example of a modern day label ‘boss’. Nurturing, warm and open, he encourages the best from his artists and receives stunning music innovations in return. ‘That’s what I like about music, and that’s what I like about running a label, you can make people happy with it. All my life I’ve been looking for something that feels fulfilling, and this is it. This is what I ended up doing, and it doesn’t really matter how I got there. There are so many other things I could have done, I could have been a famous architect or a famous singer in an infamous band! But I ended up forming Erased Tapes and it’s something that means a lot to me, to my artists and to a lot of other people out there.’

From all of us here at The Monograph we would just like to say thanks to Erased Tapes for being so helping in working with us for Label of the Month. For more information on Erased Tapes and the work they do please visithttp://erasedtapes.co.uk

Source: http://themonograph.co.uk/2010/08/robert-raths-interview/

Falling From Trees at Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2010

Presented by Neon Productions and Erased Tapes.

6 - 7 August 2010 (preview) | 8 – 14 August 2010, 2:30pm

Venue: Zoo Roxy - The Sanctuary | 2 Roxburgh Place, Edinburgh EH8 9SU | Festival venue no. 115

Admission: £10 / £8 concessions / £5 preview 

Tickets: http://edfringe.com/whats-on/dance-physical-theatre/falling-from-trees

Falling From Trees, choreographed by Adrienne Hart is set in a psychiatric hospital and delves into the mind of a resident patient. The piece explores how a neurological disease can alter your sense of self and relationship to the world and people around you. Inspired by the work of neurologist Oliver Sacks, Adrienne has created her own dance narrative based on her research of several neurological disorders. Sacks’ popular book titled ‘The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat’, and one particular short story of a man with visual agnosia served as a catalyst for the development of Adrienne’s Falling From Trees.

The piece is performed by Jennifer Essex, Adrienne Hart, David Lloyd andFabíola Santana.

Neon Productions is a cross media based dance company that creates work for the stage and screen.  

‘Highly articulate… an ambitious piece and powerful in its content’ –
Josephine Leask (Guardian)

‘Concise and eerie, this is a poignant work’ – Lauren Strain (Muso Magazine)

Falling From Trees features video projection by filmmaker Alice Powell (National Film and Television School) and original music composed by the critically acclaimed composer Peter Broderick

 ‘A songwriter of beguiling depth’The Sunday Times 

‘Adrienne told me from the beginning she was looking for a score of piano and strings. So I decided to take this literally and make a rule not to use any other instruments. In the script it called for a ticking clock. I made this sound by tapping on the body of the violin with my fingernails. The sound of an electric shock given to the patient is depicted by a quick, distorted piano chord.’

Peter Broderick - Music For Falling From Trees (Erased Tapes)

‘Music for Falling From Trees’ out now on Erased Tapes Records.


Falling From Trees will also be performed at Swindon Dance on August 3rd, 7:30pm as a fundraiser for Edinburgh, featuring an after show DJ set by Rival Consoles.

Tickets: 

http://www.swindondance.org.uk/events/event.aspx?id=27

THE GUARDIAN Interview‘The music I play inspires my life’
German musician Nils Frahm is bringing his neo-classical music to London, writes Rachel Wakefield.
 Look how happy Nils Frahm is on the cover of The Bells – his second album released this week in the UK. The German pianist has a lot to smile about, “I feel that I have the great luck to be surrounded by some of the brightest and nicest human beings on earth.” This happy quality shines through our interview as he explains his love for the piano. ”It’s a magical instrument; and I’ve loved it from the beginning.” Nils’ love for the piano began, “as soon as my hands could reach the keyboard, I started wracking my parents’ nerves.” Growing up in an old farmhouse near Hamburg, Nils had the good fortune to be taught by Nahum Brodski – a student of the last scholar of Tschaikowsky . “My teacher was a very strict and humble person. He played big shows in Russia during the ‘60s and ‘70s, but then he had to leave his country for political reasons. Accidentally, he ended up in our small town and my father discovered him by chance. “I think I became his favourite student and he tried to make a classical pianist out of me. He didn’t succeed. I learned more about jazz afterwards and started playing in bands.” And that is how it would have stayed, if he hadn’t been discovered by alternative, acoustic folk musician Peter Broderick. “Meeting Peter has changed my life a lot,” enthuses Nils. “Before him I was not connected to a musical scene at all. I played the same music and worked already as a session musician, but I never considered playing live shows or solo piano. The piano was a very private thing to me. I was working in a studio, recording and writing music. Playing piano was more of a little side project really. It was amazing to hear from a gifted guy like Peter that I should release my piano work. Until that point I had little confidence in my music. Without him my life would be very different.” And, so it was with Peter’s enthusiasm and support, the pair collaborated on recording Nils’ piano improvisations on a Bösendorfer Imperial D piano for this album, The Bells. “We rented this wonderful, old church in Berlin called Grunewald for two days,” explains Nils. “And the only thing I knew was that in those two days I needed to record all the material. So it was kind of thrilling. The atmosphere in this location was incredible. We recorded only at night. The acoustics and the place itself added a pretty serious and sacral atmosphere to the recordings. I left the church with five-and-a-half hours worth of music and started to select some bits with Peter’s help. The collection of these became The Bells album.” It’s a beautiful thing and a great starter for overcoming any prejudices you may have about classical music. It’s not bland, it’s not aural wallpaper, and it’s definitely not hard to listen to. All you need to do is shut your eyes and listen. “Hopefully I can take people away on a little musical journey, or a journey inside,” explains the 28-year-old, neo-classical composer about his music. “After shows people tell me that listening to my sets is like travelling. I like that and I hope that I can repeat the trick also here in London. “My aim is to improvise from the album as much as possible. You never get stuck when you improvise, it is just important to keep yourself entertained and in a joyful mood.” And when I ask him what inspires him musically, his happy feelings start shining through again. “I think the life I am living inspires my music the most; and the music I play inspires my life. I am a lucky fella.”Nils Frahm with Simon Scott (ex drummer of Slowdive) at the Union Chapel, Compton Avenue, Islington on Saturday, May 22. Nils Frahm with Heather Woods Broderick at Café Oto, Ashwin Street, Dalston, on Tuesday, May 25.Q&A WITH NILS FRAHM Q: What is your motivation behind your tour and what do you hope the audience will experience?NF: Hopefully I can take people away on a little musical journey, or a journey inside. After shows people tell me that listening to my sets is like travelling. I like that and I hope that I can repeat the trick also at my London shows. Also my wonderful label Erased Tapes is based in London, which makes the city a special place to perform in. They actually added a third concert at Café Oto for the 25th, so people who are interested in seeing my show have to decide which venue they prefer. The show on the 27th is already sold out I think. Q:You will be performing with Simon Scott on May 22 and with Jóhann Jóhannsson & Greg Haines on May 27. Can you provide me with a little background as to how you met these esteemed musicians and what you like about their work?NF: I haven’t met Jóhann Jóhannsson yet but I love his music. I admire his genuine compositions and his overall aesthetic. Simon Scott and me already worked together on a 7”, which will come out on the Sonic Pieces label at the end of the year. I have seen a few shows of his and he makes some of the best drone music I’ve heard so far. He’s a really gifted and talented musician. Greg Haines is also a good friend. He actually lives in my room while I am on tour right now. So you could say that we know each another. His recent album Until The Point Of Hushed Support is undoubtedly a masterpiece. I can’t believe how good it is. I get so inspired by the music of my friends. I am a lucky fella. Q:How did you go about deciding on which work to use for these series of concerts?NF: I usually make up my mind before I go on stage and try not to think about the show too much. My aim is to improvise the set as much as possible. Sometimes it is really easy to do that, and I am able to develop new material only for this one night. At other times I end up playing more songs from my two recorded albums. Usually it is a mix of both. Q: Performing for a UK audience or performing for a European audience – what’s the difference for you?NF: I wish I had more experience, but from what I have seen so far every night is different. It is not so much about the country you are playing in, but more about the vibe of the venue. I think that people in the UK are a little more outgoing and interactive than most of the European crowds. Q: Can you explain the story behind The Bells and your collaboration with Peter Broderick?NF: Peter became my closest friend over the last year and meeting him has changed my life a lot. Before him I was not connected to a musical scene at all. I played the same music and worked already as a musician, but I never considered playing live shows or solo piano. The piano was a very private thing to me. I was working in a studio, recording and writing music. Playing piano was more of a little side project really. It was amazing to hear from a gifted guy like Peter that I should release my piano work. Until that point I had little confidence in my music. Without Peter my life would be very different and I am so thankful for all his help and support.Working on The Bells was indeed really different from working on Wintermusik[Nils Frahm’s debut album]. Before we started I talked to Peter Broderick, who produced the album, about a possible approach. And finally we rented this old, wonderful church in Berlin for two days and the only thing I knew was that in these two days I needed to record all the material. One rule of Kning Disk’s Piano Series (the album was first released by Kning Disk in Sweden and is now part of Erased Tapes’ catalogue for the UK, Ireland and North America) is to not add or edit the recorded piano material. So it was kind of thrilling. The atmosphere in this location was incredible. We recorded only at night. The acoustics and the place itself added a pretty serious and sacral atmosphere to the recordings. I left the church with a few hours worth of music and started to select some bits with Peter’s help. The collection of these bits became the album. Q: Why did you choose the Grunewald Church as a venue for the recording of this album?NF:This place just seemed incredibly special and nice sounding to me. And when I listen back to the recording with my eyes closed, I can travel back to that very place and relive the experience. Q: What instrument did you use – was it the church’s own organ or did you bring in your own keyboard?NF: Actually, the instrument I used was a grand piano – a Bösendorfer Imperial D. Q:Can you tell me about any difficulties you had in recording the improvisations and how you overcame them?NF: I can’t think of any major difficulties during the recording process. You never get stuck when you improvise, it is just important to keep yourself entertained and in a joyful mood. When you messed up a part or hit a wrong tone, you can’t just re-record it, because you just made it all up. Then you have to try something else and be able to let go of the previous take. I love this way of approaching a record, but I also like the process of writing pieces. Q:How do you get overcome your nerves before a performance? Do you have a routine that gets you motivated?NF:I have to say that I am nervous before every show I play. It is a nice feeling that I never want to overcome. Playing my music for an audience is the most personal and delicate thing. It is nerve wracking and wonderful and I try to take good care of it, so that it never becomes just a job or routine. Q: Where do you rehearse?NF: I have a piano at home, but also a rehearsal space with some amps and drum kits. I play with my friends there. It is fun to play loud music once in a while. Q:How would you describe yourself as an artist?NF: This is a hard question to answer… I guess I am an experienced musician who can produce interesting music. But I don’t know if that makes me an artist and I also don’t really know what it means. I follow my intuition in any aspect and this is all I can do and all I would like to say about that. Q: Who inspired you to become a pianist?NF: I think the piano itself. It is a magical instrument. And I loved it from the very beginning. I started to wrack my parents’ nerves as soon as my hands could reach the keyboard. Q: How long did it take you to master the piano? And what is the highest grade you achieved?NF: I don’t know much about grades, but I basically studied my whole life. I had lessons for about 9 years, which helped me a lot. Q: Your biography states you were taught by Nahum Brodski – a student of the last scholar of Tschaikowski – can you provide me with some background as to how you caught the ear of this teacher and became his student?NF: My teacher was a very strict and humble person. He played big shows in Russia during the 60s and 70s, but then he had to leave his country for political reasons. Accidently he ended up in the small town I grew up in and my father discovered him by chance. So it was big luck. I think I became his favourite student and he tried to make a classical pianist out of me. He didn’t succeed. I learned more about jazz afterwards and started playing in bands. Q: What other instruments do you play?NF: Not too many, I worked on electronic music for quite a while and learned that every item can be used as an instrument. But I never mastered any other instruments. Q: What inspires you musically?NF: I think the life I am living inspires my music the most and the music I play inspires my life. It is hard to tell where music comes from. You might say partly from listening to music. Here is a list of musicians who have a big influence on me: Arvo Pärt, Chopin, Satie, Valentin Silvestrov, Steve Reich, Keith Jarrett, Moondog, John Surman, David Darling, Bill Evans, Philipp Glass. But also more contemporary artists like: Peter Broderick, Greg Haines, Dustin O Halloran, Machinefabriek, Heather Woods Broderick, John Convertino, F.S. Blumm. Q: What’s your favourite piece to perform on stage?NF: Right now I am working on a pattern piece, which has no title yet. I perform it every night right now and it is very satisfying to play this piece. It puts me in this meditative mindset. I will try to record a version of it for my next album. Q: What’s your favourite piece to relax and play at home?NF: I play sheet music from all kinds of composers. I think Bach pieces are my favourites, but the easier ones. I also like to play jazz standards. Q:Can you provide me with some background information about yourself?NF: My father works as a photographer and my mother as a family councillor. I grew up in an old farmhouse near Hamburg. My mother plays the piano and so did my father. They were both into music and art, and I had the great opportunity to go through their wonderful record collection whenever I wanted to. My brother played the flute for a while but he didn’t keep it up. I always knew that I wanted to be a musician and it is so fulfilling to be able to make a living with that now. My parents are very happy although not too surprised by my ‘success’. They always had confidence that I would be able to work as a musician. So I grew up in Hamburg but I moved to Berlin four years ago and I love this city. It is a wonderful place for all kinds of artists I guess, because the rents are cheap and every day new amazing people join the city. It feels like an El Dorado for art. Q: After these concerts in May, what’s next for you?NF: I am looking forward to recording my next album on Erased Tapes. I am so excited to be on this label, it’s an honour to be represented by them. Also I will release two collaboration records this year and work in the studio together with bands like Deaf Center and Grand Salvo. In autumn I will be on a European tour with Rachel Grimes, which is a huge honour as well. She just released a wonderful solo piano record called Book Of Leaves. I am also a big fan of Rachel’s. Q: If your life was a musical note what would it be?NF:Bb(?) Q: If you were shipwrecked on a desert island which one composer’s work would you like to have to keep you company?NF: Bach Q: What was the first album you ever bought?NF: The Offspring (haha) Q: What’s on your iPod at the moment?NF: Too much I would say, but I love the solo piano record from the composer and pianist Valentin Silvestrov. Q: Can you tell me about the best concert you’ve ever seen?NF: I have seen Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians in Baden-Baden a few years ago and I had goose bumps over and over… maybe my favourite piece of all times. Q: Who’s your favourite musician – and why?NF: I have so many, it never feels right to make a top list of artists. One day I think ‘this guy’ is the best musician the next day I feel that ‘she’ has written the most beautiful song… Q: Who’s your favourite author – and why?NF: I am in love with Siri Hustvedt’s book What I loved. Q: What electrical item couldn’t you live without?NF: I wouldn’t like to live without my studio. Recording music needs power and I hope that they will never cut it off. Q: What was your favourite lesson at school?NF: History. Q: What did you learn at school outside the classroom?NF: That it is not always easy to make good friends. Q: Where are you most happy?NF: Sitting at the piano? Nooooo, in my bed I would say. Q: How would your friends describe you?NF: Some say I am patient, but I am not. I feel that I mellow out a bit and I have the great luck to be surrounded by some of the brightest and nicest human beings on earth. They say I am a loving person.
Source: http://www.guardian-series.co.uk/leisure/music/8131753.___The_music_I_play_inspires_my_life___/

THE GUARDIAN Interview

‘The music I play inspires my life’

German musician Nils Frahm is bringing his neo-classical music to London, writes Rachel Wakefield.


Look how happy Nils Frahm is on the cover of The Bells – his second album released this week in the UK. The German pianist has a lot to smile about, “I feel that I have the great luck to be surrounded by some of the brightest and nicest human beings on earth.”

This happy quality shines through our interview as he explains his love for the piano. ”It’s a magical instrument; and I’ve loved it from the beginning.”

Nils’ love for the piano began, “as soon as my hands could reach the keyboard, I started wracking my parents’ nerves.”

Growing up in an old farmhouse near Hamburg, Nils had the good fortune to be taught by Nahum Brodski – a student of the last scholar of Tschaikowsky .

“My teacher was a very strict and humble person. He played big shows in Russia during the ‘60s and ‘70s, but then he had to leave his country for political reasons. Accidentally, he ended up in our small town and my father discovered him by chance.

“I think I became his favourite student and he tried to make a classical pianist out of me. He didn’t succeed. I learned more about jazz afterwards and started playing in bands.”

And that is how it would have stayed, if he hadn’t been discovered by alternative, acoustic folk musician Peter Broderick.

“Meeting Peter has changed my life a lot,” enthuses Nils. “Before him I was not connected to a musical scene at all. I played the same music and worked already as a session musician, but I never considered playing live shows or solo piano. The piano was a very private thing to me. I was working in a studio, recording and writing music. Playing piano was more of a little side project really. It was amazing to hear from a gifted guy like Peter that I should release my piano work. Until that point I had little confidence in my music. Without him my life would be very different.”

And, so it was with Peter’s enthusiasm and support, the pair collaborated on recording Nils’ piano improvisations on a Bösendorfer Imperial D piano for this album, The Bells.

“We rented this wonderful, old church in Berlin called Grunewald for two days,” explains Nils. “And the only thing I knew was that in those two days I needed to record all the material. So it was kind of thrilling. The atmosphere in this location was incredible. We recorded only at night. The acoustics and the place itself added a pretty serious and sacral atmosphere to the recordings. I left the church with five-and-a-half hours worth of music and started to select some bits with Peter’s help. The collection of these became The Bells album.”

It’s a beautiful thing and a great starter for overcoming any prejudices you may have about classical music. It’s not bland, it’s not aural wallpaper, and it’s definitely not hard to listen to. All you need to do is shut your eyes and listen.

“Hopefully I can take people away on a little musical journey, or a journey inside,” explains the 28-year-old, neo-classical composer about his music. “After shows people tell me that listening to my sets is like travelling. I like that and I hope that I can repeat the trick also here in London.

“My aim is to improvise from the album as much as possible. You never get stuck when you improvise, it is just important to keep yourself entertained and in a joyful mood.”

And when I ask him what inspires him musically, his happy feelings start shining through again. “I think the life I am living inspires my music the most; and the music I play inspires my life. I am a lucky fella.”

Nils Frahm with Simon Scott (ex drummer of Slowdive) at the Union Chapel, Compton Avenue, Islington on Saturday, May 22. Nils Frahm with Heather Woods Broderick at Café Oto, Ashwin Street, Dalston, on Tue
sday, May 25.

Q&A WITH NILS FRAHM

Q: What is your motivation behind your tour and what do you hope the audience will experience?
NF: Hopefully I can take people away on a little musical journey, or a journey inside. After shows people tell me that listening to my sets is like travelling. I like that and I hope that I can repeat the trick also at my London shows. Also my wonderful label Erased Tapes is based in London, which makes the city a special place to perform in. They actually added a third concert at Café Oto for the 25th, so people who are interested in seeing my show have to decide which venue they prefer. The show on the 27th is already sold out I think.

Q:You will be performing with Simon Scott on May 22 and with Jóhann Jóhannsson & Greg Haines on May 27. Can you provide me with a little background as to how you met these esteemed musicians and what you like about their work?
NF: I haven’t met Jóhann Jóhannsson yet but I love his music. I admire his genuine compositions and his overall aesthetic. Simon Scott and me already worked together on a 7”, which will come out on the Sonic Pieces label at the end of the year. I have seen a few shows of his and he makes some of the best drone music I’ve heard so far. He’s a really gifted and talented musician. Greg Haines is also a good friend. He actually lives in my room while I am on tour right now. So you could say that we know each another. His recent album Until The Point Of Hushed Support is undoubtedly a masterpiece. I can’t believe how good it is. I get so inspired by the music of my friends. I am a lucky fella.

Q:How did you go about deciding on which work to use for these series of concerts?
NF: I usually make up my mind before I go on stage and try not to think about the show too much. My aim is to improvise the set as much as possible. Sometimes it is really easy to do that, and I am able to develop new material only for this one night. At other times I end up playing more songs from my two recorded albums. Usually it is a mix of both.

Q: Performing for a UK audience or performing for a European audience – what’s the difference for you?
NF: I wish I had more experience, but from what I have seen so far every night is different. It is not so much about the country you are playing in, but more about the vibe of the venue. I think that people in the UK are a little more outgoing and interactive than most of the European crowds.

Q: Can you explain the story behind The Bells and your collaboration with Peter Broderick?
NF: Peter became my closest friend over the last year and meeting him has changed my life a lot. Before him I was not connected to a musical scene at all. I played the same music and worked already as a musician, but I never considered playing live shows or solo piano. The piano was a very private thing to me. I was working in a studio, recording and writing music. Playing piano was more of a little side project really. It was amazing to hear from a gifted guy like Peter that I should release my piano work. Until that point I had little confidence in my music. Without Peter my life would be very different and I am so thankful for all his help and support.

Working on The Bells was indeed really different from working on Wintermusik[Nils Frahm’s debut album]. Before we started I talked to Peter Broderick, who produced the album, about a possible approach. And finally we rented this old, wonderful church in Berlin for two days and the only thing I knew was that in these two days I needed to record all the material. One rule of Kning Disk’s Piano Series (the album was first released by Kning Disk in Sweden and is now part of Erased Tapes’ catalogue for the UK, Ireland and North America) is to not add or edit the recorded piano material. So it was kind of thrilling. The atmosphere in this location was incredible. We recorded only at night. The acoustics and the place itself added a pretty serious and sacral atmosphere to the recordings. I left the church with a few hours worth of music and started to select some bits with Peter’s help. The collection of these bits became the album.

Q: Why did you choose the Grunewald Church as a venue for the recording of this album?
NF:This place just seemed incredibly special and nice sounding to me. And when I listen back to the recording with my eyes closed, I can travel back to that very place and relive the experience.

Q: What instrument did you use – was it the church’s own organ or did you bring in your own keyboard?
NF: Actually, the instrument I used was a grand piano – a Bösendorfer Imperial D.

Q:Can you tell me about any difficulties you had in recording the improvisations and how you overcame them?
NF: I can’t think of any major difficulties during the recording process. You never get stuck when you improvise, it is just important to keep yourself entertained and in a joyful mood. When you messed up a part or hit a wrong tone, you can’t just re-record it, because you just made it all up. Then you have to try something else and be able to let go of the previous take. I love this way of approaching a record, but I also like the process of writing pieces.

Q:How do you get overcome your nerves before a performance? Do you have a routine that gets you motivated?
NF:I have to say that I am nervous before every show I play. It is a nice feeling that I never want to overcome. Playing my music for an audience is the most personal and delicate thing. It is nerve wracking and wonderful and I try to take good care of it, so that it never becomes just a job or routine.

Q: Where do you rehearse?
NF: I have a piano at home, but also a rehearsal space with some amps and drum kits. I play with my friends there. It is fun to play loud music once in a while.

Q:How would you describe yourself as an artist?
NF: This is a hard question to answer… I guess I am an experienced musician who can produce interesting music. But I don’t know if that makes me an artist and I also don’t really know what it means. I follow my intuition in any aspect and this is all I can do and all I would like to say about that.

Q: Who inspired you to become a pianist?
NF: I think the piano itself. It is a magical instrument. And I loved it from the very beginning. I started to wrack my parents’ nerves as soon as my hands could reach the keyboard.

Q: How long did it take you to master the piano? And what is the highest grade you achieved?
NF: I don’t know much about grades, but I basically studied my whole life. I had lessons for about 9 years, which helped me a lot.

Q: Your biography states you were taught by Nahum Brodski – a student of the last scholar of Tschaikowski – can you provide me with some background as to how you caught the ear of this teacher and became his student?
NF: My teacher was a very strict and humble person. He played big shows in Russia during the 60s and 70s, but then he had to leave his country for political reasons. Accidently he ended up in the small town I grew up in and my father discovered him by chance. So it was big luck. I think I became his favourite student and he tried to make a classical pianist out of me. He didn’t succeed. I learned more about jazz afterwards and started playing in bands.

Q: What other instruments do you play?
NF: Not too many, I worked on electronic music for quite a while and learned that every item can be used as an instrument. But I never mastered any other instruments.

Q: What inspires you musically?
NF: I think the life I am living inspires my music the most and the music I play inspires my life. It is hard to tell where music comes from. You might say partly from listening to music. Here is a list of musicians who have a big influence on me: Arvo Pärt, Chopin, Satie, Valentin Silvestrov, Steve Reich, Keith Jarrett, Moondog, John Surman, David Darling, Bill Evans, Philipp Glass. But also more contemporary artists like: Peter Broderick, Greg Haines, Dustin O Halloran, Machinefabriek, Heather Woods Broderick, John Convertino, F.S. Blumm.

Q: What’s your favourite piece to perform on stage?
NF: Right now I am working on a pattern piece, which has no title yet. I perform it every night right now and it is very satisfying to play this piece. It puts me in this meditative mindset. I will try to record a version of it for my next album.

Q: What’s your favourite piece to relax and play at home?
NF: I play sheet music from all kinds of composers. I think Bach pieces are my favourites, but the easier ones. I also like to play jazz standards.

Q:Can you provide me with some background information about yourself?
NF: My father works as a photographer and my mother as a family councillor. I grew up in an old farmhouse near Hamburg. My mother plays the piano and so did my father. They were both into music and art, and I had the great opportunity to go through their wonderful record collection whenever I wanted to. My brother played the flute for a while but he didn’t keep it up. I always knew that I wanted to be a musician and it is so fulfilling to be able to make a living with that now. My parents are very happy although not too surprised by my ‘success’. They always had confidence that I would be able to work as a musician. So I grew up in Hamburg but I moved to Berlin four years ago and I love this city. It is a wonderful place for all kinds of artists I guess, because the rents are cheap and every day new amazing people join the city. It feels like an El Dorado for art.

Q: After these concerts in May, what’s next for you?
NF: I am looking forward to recording my next album on Erased Tapes. I am so excited to be on this label, it’s an honour to be represented by them. Also I will release two collaboration records this year and work in the studio together with bands like Deaf Center and Grand Salvo. In autumn I will be on a European tour with Rachel Grimes, which is a huge honour as well. She just released a wonderful solo piano record called Book Of Leaves. I am also a big fan of Rachel’s.

Q: If your life was a musical note what would it be?
NF:Bb(?)

Q: If you were shipwrecked on a desert island which one composer’s work would you like to have to keep you company?
NF: Bach

Q: What was the first album you ever bought?
NF: The Offspring (haha)

Q: What’s on your iPod at the moment?
NF: Too much I would say, but I love the solo piano record from the composer and pianist Valentin Silvestrov.

Q: Can you tell me about the best concert you’ve ever seen?
NF: I have s
een Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians in Baden-Baden a few years ago and I had goose bumps over and over… maybe my favourite piece of all times.

Q: Who’s your favourite musician – and why?
NF: I have so many, it never feels right to make a top list of artists. One day I think ‘this guy’ is the best musician the next day I feel that ‘she’ has written the most beautiful song…

Q: Who’s your favourite author – and why?
NF: I am in love with Siri Hustvedt’s book What I loved.

Q: What electrical item couldn’t you live without?
NF: I wouldn’t like to live without my studio. Recording music needs power and I hope that they will never cut it off.

Q: What was your favourite lesson at school?
NF: History.

Q: What did you learn at school outside the classroom?
NF: That it is not always easy to make good friends.

Q: Where are you most happy?
NF: Sitting at the piano? Nooooo, in my bed I would say.

Q: How would your friends describe you?
NF: Some say I am patient, but I am not. I feel that I mellow out a bit and I have the great luck to be surrounded by some of the brightest and nicest human beings on earth. They say I am a loving person.

Source: http://www.guardian-series.co.uk/leisure/music/8131753.___The_music_I_play_inspires_my_life___/


VARIOUS ERASED TAPES ARTISTS - ‘Erased Tapes Collection II’  OUT NOW!
Our second label compilation is now available in high quality and received a really great review from UK’s leading music portal:
‘Pure sonic perfection’ (8/10) – Drowned In Sound
London based independent Erased Tapes may only be entering its third year of existence, but already it’s carved out a reputation for discovering innovative new artists from all around the globe. Previously responsible for introducing the ethereal sounds of Kyte, organic post-rock of Codes In The Clouds and icy electronica of Ólafur Arnalds, Erased Tapes has slowly built up a roster it can not only be proud of, but also one genuinely envied by many of its contemporaries, both old and new.
Having unleashed its first collection of then (mostly) unknown artists back in the summer of 2008, it’s been a rapid ascent for Erased Tapes, something label founder Robert Raths probably never imagined in his wildest dreams. Erased Tapes: Collection II takes up the story from where its predecessor left off. While familiar names such as the aforementioned Codes In The Clouds and Ólafur Arnalds both make an appearance - indeed if you haven’t already purchased the latter’s Found Songs then you really should - it’s some of the less established acts on Raths’ impressive roster that really stand out.
Rival Consoles – aka London musician Ryan Lee West – feature three times , and deliver forcefully on each. The delightful '1985' from last summer’s IO long player remains one of 2009’s most engaging pieces of electronic-based music, while ‘Helvetica’ off the EP of the same name tells the story of an obsession with Warp Records and all its eccentricities through the eyes of a starstruck twenty-something, only with an added dose of wisdom thrown in.
Berlin-based musician Nils Frahm contributes the sombre, neo-classical 'Ambre' from his debut LP Wintermusik, released at the tail end of last year. Fellow label newcomer Finn. – aka Hamburg singer/songwriter Patrick Zimmer – offers the dramatic, lo-fi cinerama of 'Boy-Cott' off his The Low Priced Heartbreakers You Can Own opus that doesn’t actually sail far off the mark of those Leonard Cohen and Junior Boys comparisons he’s often labelled with.
The undoubted highlight of Erased Tapes: Compilation II however comes in the form of '65', a six minute slab of haunting dance-infused mellow tronica courtesy of Olafur Arnalds and Janus 'Bloodgroup' Rasmussen’s recent side project Kiasmos, which weaves exquisite, mesmerising patterns from beginning to end that recall the likes of Photek at his finest. Add the inimitable subtleties of Peter Broderick and Nico Muhly to an already unimpeachable list and you’ve one of the most essential compilations released in a long, long while. What’s more, it’s free to download from the label’s own website in low res, but with such an array of talent on offer as this, we implore you buy the HD version or each artist’s physical release instead.In a nutshell, pure sonic perfection.
8 / 10
by Dom Gourlay  10:21 January 8th, 2010
Source: http://drownedinsound.com/releases/15000/reviews/4138753

VARIOUS ERASED TAPES ARTISTS - ‘Erased Tapes Collection II’  OUT NOW!

Our second label compilation is now available in high quality and received a really great review from UK’s leading music portal:

Pure sonic perfection’ (8/10) – Drowned In Sound

London based independent Erased Tapes may only be entering its third year of existence, but already it’s carved out a reputation for discovering innovative new artists from all around the globe. Previously responsible for introducing the ethereal sounds of Kyte, organic post-rock of Codes In The Clouds and icy electronica of Ólafur Arnalds, Erased Tapes has slowly built up a roster it can not only be proud of, but also one genuinely envied by many of its contemporaries, both old and new.


Having unleashed its first collection of then (mostly) unknown artists back in the summer of 2008, it’s been a rapid ascent for Erased Tapes, something label founder Robert Raths probably never imagined in his wildest dreams. Erased Tapes: Collection II takes up the story from where its predecessor left off. While familiar names such as the aforementioned Codes In The Clouds and Ólafur Arnalds both make an appearance - indeed if you haven’t already purchased the latter’s Found Songs then you really should - it’s some of the less established acts on Raths’ impressive roster that really stand out.


Rival Consoles – aka London musician Ryan Lee West – feature three times , and deliver forcefully on each. The delightful '1985' from last summer’s IO long player remains one of 2009’s most engaging pieces of electronic-based music, while ‘Helvetica’ off the EP of the same name tells the story of an obsession with Warp Records and all its eccentricities through the eyes of a starstruck twenty-something, only with an added dose of wisdom thrown in.


Berlin-based musician Nils Frahm contributes the sombre, neo-classical 'Ambre' from his debut LP Wintermusik, released at the tail end of last year. Fellow label newcomer Finn. – aka Hamburg singer/songwriter Patrick Zimmer – offers the dramatic, lo-fi cinerama of 'Boy-Cott' off his The Low Priced Heartbreakers You Can Own opus that doesn’t actually sail far off the mark of those Leonard Cohen and Junior Boys comparisons he’s often labelled with.


The undoubted highlight of Erased Tapes: Compilation II however comes in the form of '65', a six minute slab of haunting dance-infused mellow tronica courtesy of Olafur Arnalds and Janus 'Bloodgroup' Rasmussen’s recent side project Kiasmos, which weaves exquisite, mesmerising patterns from beginning to end that recall the likes of Photek at his finest. Add the inimitable subtleties of Peter Broderick and Nico Muhly to an already unimpeachable list and you’ve one of the most essential compilations released in a long, long while. What’s more, it’s free to download from the label’s own website in low res, but with such an array of talent on offer as this, we implore you buy the HD version or each artist’s physical release instead.
In a nutshell, pure sonic perfection.

8 / 10

by Dom Gourlay  10:21 January 8th, 2010


Source: http://drownedinsound.com/releases/15000/reviews/4138753

3 YEARS OF ERASED TAPES

Dear friends of the Erased Tapes collective! 

Instead of trying to summarise all these wonderful moments we’ve had since I officially founded Erased Tapes on February 5, 2007, I decided to simply throw it all onto the table and film it.

These aren’t just things to me. They are dreams we dreamt. They are marks we leave behind. They are mountain peaks we’ve climbed. These things might not mean much to anyone who hasn’t been part of this trip. But it awakes a lot of memories for me and the Erased Tapes family. So let’s travel back in time and remember some of these moments we’ve had together.

Let art speak for itself.

Happy New Year 2010 everybody!

love, 
Robert

p.s.
I want to give something back to everyone who has supported us and our artists ever since they discovered us. So let’s celebrate our 3rd anniversary with a FREE Digital Download compilation entitled 'Erased Tapes Collection II'. Visit http://ddc.erasedtapes.com and type in the following download code: MY-FREE-ERATP020. I hope you’ll enjoy it!

If you want to help, then all we ask of you is to tell your friends about us and our artists’ music. You can also support us and the artists even more by purchasing the HIGH QUALITY DOWNLOAD of ‘Erased Tapes Collection II’ or any other record on http://store.erasedtapes.com

And don’t forget to follow us on Twitterhttp://twitter.com/erasedtapes if you can… 

2009>2010 New Year’s Eve Label Interview: Erased Tapes Records
Published by GoodMorninCaptn.com
WHILE WE DISCOVERED ERASED TAPES RECORDS THIS YEAR THANKS TO PETER BRODERICK AND ÓLAFUR ARNALDS RELEASES, THIS EXCITING YOUNG LABEL IS ALREADY PREPARING TO CELEBRATE ITS 3RD ANNIVERSARY. BASED IN LONDON, ERASED TAPES HAVE FOUND AN AESTHETIC ON THEIR OWN, SIGNING ARTISTS FROM BERLIN TO PORTLAND, FROM NEO-CLASSICAL TO POST-ROCK AND SOULFUL ELECTRONICS, BRIDGING INNOVATIVE CONTEMPLATIVE MUSICS TO CONTEMPORARY DANCE AND VISUAL ARTISTS. LABEL FOUNDER ROBERT RATHS IS PRESENTING US THE ERASED TAPES FRIENDS AND EXTENDED FAMILY, AS THE FIRST ENTRY IN OUR SERIES OF LABEL INTERVIEWS FOR THE NEW YEAR.
You can read the full interview here.
THANK YOU FOR A WONDERFUL YEAR 2009!
WE WISH YOU A HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYBODY!
love,
Robert